Science!

10 Aug

“That makes sense, because it’s usually hotter when that [star] is up in the air,” said Stillwater, OK resident Asher Arps, 31, speaking to reporters as temperature rose to 110 degrees over the weekend. “I knew it lit things up, of course, but I didn’t realize it could make things hot.”

“Apparently it’s gigantic simply because it’s closer to us than any other star,” Kivens [professor and astronomer] said. “Which would also account for why we feel this particular star’s heat during the day but are not warmed by the tiny blinking stars we see at night.”

“It’s interesting stuff,” he added.

Extremely bright and difficult to stare at directly…

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